what do you know about phrasal verb

What do you know about phrasal verb. Well a phrasal verb is a verb made up of a verb and another word (either a preposition or a particle). Here are some examples of phrasal verbs:
  • to catch up
  • to blow up
  • to break in
  • to break down
  • to cut back
A phrasal verb has a different meaning to the verb used in the phrasal verb. (For example, to catch up does not mean the same as to catch.)

A phrasal verb is also known as multi-word verb or a compound verb.

There Are Transitive and Intransitive Phrasal Verbs

Some phrasal verbs are transitive (i.e., they can take a direct object), and some phrasal verbs are intransitive (i.e., do not take a direct object).

Here are some examples of transitive phrasal verbs. (The phrasal verbs are shaded and the direct objects are in bold.)
  • Fill in the form as quickly as possible.
  • Did you go over those reports last night?
  • I will look into it immediately.
  • I felt compelled to hand the purse in .
  • (Note: Some phrasal verbs are separable. There is more on this below.)
Here are some examples of intransitive phrasal verbs. (The phrasal verbs are shaded. Of course, there are no direct objects.)
  • If you're unhappy, please stand up .
  • The lorry is starting to drop back.
  • The tree could fall down.
  • Do not give in.
Some phrasal verbs can be transitive or intransitive depending on their meaning. For example:
  • She will show up soon.
  • (This is intransitive. It means "She will appear soon.")
  • She will show up the opposition.
  • (This is transitive. It means "She will embarrass the opposition.")

There Are Separable and Inseparable Phrasal Verbs

Some transitive phrasal verbs are separable. This means the direct object appears between the verb and the preposition. For example:
  • I will make you up to look like a princess.
  • She talked her father into letting her attend the party.
Some transitive phrasal verbs are inseparable. This means the direct object appears after the preposition. For example:
  • She looks up to her sister.
  • You must stick to the plan at all costs.
Lots of transitive phrasal verbs can be used in a separable way or an inseparable way. For example:
  • He looked my address up on the National Voter Register.
  • (This is the separable way.)
  • He looked up my address on the National Voter Register.
  • (This is the inseparable way.)
  • He looked it up on the National Voter Register.
  • (Note: When the direct object is a pronoun (like it), you cannot use the inseparable way.)
  • He looked up it on the National Voter Register. 
  • (You cannot use the inseparable way when the direct object is a pronoun.)

Share this

Related Posts

Previous
Next Post »